Programs

Dunn's Woods Restoration Project

Ecology

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Research

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Dunn’s Woods is an active site for research by faculty and students. Areas of study include methods of Purple Wintercreeper control and native species restoration, the influence of the soil microbial community on growth of exotic vs. native plant species, and plant species traits such as drought tolerance. Research to date shows that hand-pulling of Purple Wintercreeper is the most effective removal technique, native plants can be slow to recover and are vulnerable to herbivory by rabbits and other animals, soil underneath Purple Wintercreeper has a unique microbial composition and promotes its growth, and Purple Wintercreeper is more tolerant of drought stress than common native species.

Presentations

Hobbs FC, Allaby E, Shanno-Firestone S, Swedo B, Gube J, Reynolds H. (2012) Wild ginger (Asarum canadense) associates with a unique soil bacterial community in a south-central Indiana woodland fragment. Poster, Indiana Academy of Science Annual Meeting, Lafayette, IN.

Rutherford WA, Bauer JT, Stoops RE, Reynolds HL. (2011). Consequences of Euonymus fortunei invasion for native plants and herbivores and initial results of management efforts. Poster, Indiana Academy of Science Annual Meeting, Indianapolis, IN

Publications

Smith L M and H L Reynolds. 2012. Positive plant-soil feedback may drive dominance of a woodland invader, Euonymus fortunei.Plant Ecology DOI 10.1007/s11258-012-0047-z.

Swedo BL, C Glinka, DR Rollo and HL Reynolds. 2008. Soil bacterial community structure under exotic versus native understory forbs in a woodland remnant in Indiana.  Proceedings of theIndiana Academy of Sciences 117:7-15.

Invasive Species Maps

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Community partner Monroe County Identify and Reduce Invasive Species (MC-IRIS) led mapping of the most common invasive plant species in Dunn's Woods using geographic information system (GIS) technology. The resulting maps show that Purple Wintercreeper (Euonymus fortunei) had invaded over 50% of the woodland by 2010. Sixteen other invasive exotic plant species were also mapped, including Japanese Bush Honeysuckle (Lonicera macckii), Tree-of-Heaven (Ailanthus altissima), Common Buckthorn (Rhamnus cathartica), and Multiflora Rose (Rosa multiflora).  The GIS maps provide a baseline to track progress and an invaluable resource for planning efficient invasive removal efforts.

Dunn's Woods Purple Winter Creeper

Dunn's Woods Invasive Species

Meet the Plants

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We are planting the following native woodland species into Dunn's Woods to restore its beauty, biological diversity, and ecological services. Native plants are adapted to local soils, climate and biota, and are part of an interdependent web of life that also includes animals and microbes. We derive many benefits from Dunn's Woods, including air quality regulation, flood regulation, climate regulation, aesthetic beauty, and recreational and educational space. Our native plant seed is collected locally or ordered from Indiana genotype suppliers.

America Bellflower

America Bellflower

Blue Flag Iris

Blue Flag Iris

Bottlebrush Grass

Bottlebrush Grass

Bushy Seedbox

Bushy Seedbox

Calico Aster

Calico Aster

Calico Beartongue

Calico Beartongue

Cardinal Flower

Cardinal Flower

Cutleaf Coneflower

Cutleaf Coneflower

Downy Wood Mint

Downy Wood Mint

False Sunflower

False Sunflower

Frank's Sedge

Frank's Sedge

Fringed Sedge

Fringed Sedge

Golden Ragwort

Golden Ragwort

Gray's Sedge

Gray's Sedge

Great Blue Lobelia

Great Blue Lobelia

Hairy Woodland Brome

Hairy Woodland Brome

Hairy Wood Mint

Hairy Wood Mint

Hop Sedge

Hop Sedge

Joe Pye Weed

Joe-Pye Weed

Mistflower

Mistflower

Orange Jewelweed

Orange Jewelweed

Panicled Aster

Panicled Aster

Spicebush

Spicebush

Stout Wood Reed

Stout Wood Reed

Thimbleweed

Thimbleweed

White Snakeroot

White Snakeroot

Wild Senna

Wild Senna

Wingstem

Wingstem

References 

ASPCA. “We are their Voice.” Accessed July 12, 2012. http://www.aspca.org/ Connecticut Botanical Society. “Gallery of Connecticut Wildflowers.” Last modified January 28, 2012. http://www.ct-botanical-society.org/galleries/galleryindex.html

Eastman, John. The Book of Field and Roadside: Open-Country Weeds, Trees, and Wildflowers of Eastern North America. Mechanicsburg, PA: Stackpole Books, 2003. Eastman, John. The Book of Forest and Thicket: Trees, shrubs, and Wildflowers of Eastern North America. Harrisburg, PA: Stackpole Books, 1992.

Haddock, Mike. “Kansas Wildflowers and Grasses.” Last modified April 6, 2012. http://www.kswildflower.org/index.php

Hilty, John." Illinois Wildflowers." Accessed June 11, 2012. http://www.illinoiswildflowers.info/index.htm Homoya, Michael A. Wildflowers and Ferns of Indiana Forests: A Field Guide. Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press, 2012. Indiana Native Plant and Wildflower Society, 2012. Accessed June 5, 2012. http://www.inpaws.org/.

Indiana Wildlife Federation, 2012. Accessed June 5 2012. http://www.indianawildlife.org/habitatPlants.htm The Jefferson Monticello. “Lucy Meriwether Lewis Marks.” Accessed July 12, 2012. http://www.monticello.org/library/exhibits/lucymarks/gallery/introduction.html

Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center. “Native Plant Database.” Accessed July 12, 2012. http://www.wildflower.org/plants/result.php?id_plant=CLAM Living Beyond Our Means: Natural Assets and Human Well-Being. Millennium Ecosystem Assessment Board (2005), 1 – 28. Midwest Invasive Plant Network. “Home.” Accessed May 18, 2012. http://mipn.org/index.html

Missouri Botanical Garden. “Researchers at MO.” Accessed May 17, 2012. http://www.mobot.org/MOBOT/Research/curators/kay.shtml

New York Natural Heritage Program. “Plants Guide.” Accessed July 12, 2012. http://www.acris.nynhp.org/plants.php

United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service. “Learning Center.” Accessed July 12, 2012. http://www.fs.usda.gov/main/htnf/learning University of Wisconsin. “Robert W. Freckmann Herbarium.” Accessed July 2, 2012. http://wisplants.uwsp.edu/index.html

U.S. Forest Services. “Celebrating Wildflowers.” Last Modified July 8, 2012. http://www.fs.fed.us/wildflowers/index.shtml U.S. Geological Survey. “Northern Prairie Wildlife Research Center.” Last modified September 22, 2011. http://www.npwrc.usgs.gov/